Citizen Earth

learn2anarchy:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police brutality in Ferguson costs taxpayers millions.

The U.S. government would rather spend six million dollars, terrorize civilians, assassinate the character or a murdered teenager and destroy a small city than hold one cop accountable. Time to pick a side.

sonofbaldwin:

The shade is that the U.S. DOES practice abroad what it practices at home: oppressing and killing people of color.

H/T
Ewuare Xola Osayande

thequeerclone:

the fact that there have no leaked nudes in my dashboard proves that i’m following the right people

micdotcom:

11 ways to solve rape better than nail polish

The more we depend on women to prevent rape, the easier it is to blame them when it happens to them. Here’s a look at the well-documented ways we can actually stop rape. Maybe it’s time we invest a little more time and resources into implementing them before we send gallons of nail polish to colleges across the country.

Read the full list | Follow micdotcom

grotesqueanddelightful:

Faces of Tibet by Steve McCurry

idopaint-themgreen:

the-fury-of-a-time-lord:

lgbtqblogs:


Two brides have become two of the most kickass women in the world by marrying to protest against homophobia in Russia.
Alina Davis, a 23-year-old trans woman, and Allison Brooks, her 19-year-old partner, donned matching white floor-length bridal gowns and married at a civil registry office earlier this month.
As Davis is still legally regarded as male, the office had no choice but to hand them a marriage certificate.
The couple said officials chided them, and appeared to be violent.
‘She called us the shame of the family and said we need medical treatment … I was afraid my pussycat [an affectionate pet name in Russian] would beat the fuck out of her,’ Davis said on her VK page.
But the couple were allowed to sign the papers, meaning a gay couple in Russia are legally recognized as married – even if it’s through a loophole. . ‘This is an important precedent for Russia,’ Davis said.
Russia banned same-sex marriage and outlawed ‘gay propaganda’ in 2013.
- See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/russian-gay-couple-marries-most-fierce-way-possible-through-loophole210814#sthash.kpKalSrr.dpuf

holy jesus look at these two warrior princesses
they are my heroes
YOU GO GIRLS

"Oh, you don’t wanna recognize my gender? Okay then lol guess you have to recognize my marriage"
that is amazing

idopaint-themgreen:

the-fury-of-a-time-lord:

lgbtqblogs:

Two brides have become two of the most kickass women in the world by marrying to protest against homophobia in Russia.

Alina Davis, a 23-year-old trans woman, and Allison Brooks, her 19-year-old partner, donned matching white floor-length bridal gowns and married at a civil registry office earlier this month.

As Davis is still legally regarded as male, the office had no choice but to hand them a marriage certificate.

The couple said officials chided them, and appeared to be violent.

‘She called us the shame of the family and said we need medical treatment … I was afraid my pussycat [an affectionate pet name in Russian] would beat the fuck out of her,’ Davis said on her VK page.

But the couple were allowed to sign the papers, meaning a gay couple in Russia are legally recognized as married – even if it’s through a loophole.
.
‘This is an important precedent for Russia,’ Davis said.

Russia banned same-sex marriage and outlawed ‘gay propaganda’ in 2013.

- See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/russian-gay-couple-marries-most-fierce-way-possible-through-loophole210814#sthash.kpKalSrr.dpuf

holy jesus look at these two warrior princesses

they are my heroes

YOU GO GIRLS

"Oh, you don’t wanna recognize my gender? Okay then lol guess you have to recognize my marriage"

that is amazing

america-wakiewakie:

1) Colorblind

What they say:

“People are just people.”  ”I don’t see color.”  ”We’re all just human.”   “Character, not color, is what counts with me.”

Response:

“Colorblindness” negates the cultural values, norms, expectations and life experiences of people of color. Even if an individual white person can ignore a person’s skin color, society does not.

Claiming to be “colorblind” can also be a defense when someone is afraid to discuss racism, especially if the assumption is that all conversation about race or color is racist.  Color consciousness does not equal racism.

2) Reverse Racism

What they say:

“Blacks cry ‘racism’ for everything, even though they are more or just as racist as white people.”

Response:

Let’s first define racism with this formula: Racism = racial prejudice + systemic institutional power.

To say people of color can be racist, denies the power imbalance inherent in racism. Although some Black people dislike whites and act on that prejudice to insult or hurt them, that’s not the same as systematically oppressing them and negatively affecting every aspect of their lives.

People of color, as a social group, do not possess the societal, institutional power to oppress white people as a group. An individual Black person who is abusing a white person, while clearly wrong, is acting out a personal racial prejudice, not racism.

3) It’s Not Race

What they say:

“It’s not race, it’s economics.”  ”Classism is the new racism.”

Response:

“Being Black and middle class is fundamentally different to being white and middle class.” This is what  Dr. Nicola Rollock, a researcher at The Institute of Education at the University at Birmingham in the U.K., said after researching the issue.

For the report, “The Educational Strategies of the Black Middle Classes,” Rollock and her team looked at African-Caribbean families in particular, and confirmed that there is a Black “middle class”  who work very hard to do the best for their children. But researchers also discovered that social status and relative wealth do not protect Black people from racism.

Racism is a reality in the lives of  Black middle-class families and it extends to the upper class too, as Oprah Winfrey would agree based on her widely reported racial-profiling incident at a Zurich boutique last year.

4) Blame the Victim

What they say:

“Blacks are not willing to work hard.”  ”Blacks feel entitled and want everything handed to them.”  ”Blacks hold themselves back, not racism.”   “We have advertised everywhere, there just aren’t any qualified Blacks for this job.”

Response:

When blame-the-victim tactics are used, it provides an escape from discussing the real problem: racism. Therefore, the agents of racism, white people and their institutions, can avoid acknowledging a system of oppression exists.

As long as the focus remains on Black folks, white people can minimize or dismiss our experiences and never have to deal with their responsibility or collusion in racism and white privilege.

5) Deny, Deny, Deny

What they say:

“Blacks are unfairly favored, whites are not.”

Response:

This form of denial is based on the false notion that the playing field is now level. When some white folks are expected to suddenly share their privilege, access and advantage, they often perceive it as discrimination. White people’s attacks on programs like affirmative action and Black History Month are usually rooted in this false perception.

6) Pull Yourself Up by Your Bootstraps

What they say:

“America is the land of opportunity, built by rugged individuals, where anyone with grit can succeed if they just pull up hard enough on their bootstraps. So Blacks need to pull themselves up from the bottom like everyone else.”

Response:

U.S. social propaganda has convinced many people that an individual’s hard work is the main determinant of success in the country. This ideology totally denies the impact of either oppression or privilege on any person’s chance for success, and pretends that every individual, regardless of color, gender, disability, etc.,  has the same access to the rights, benefits and responsibilities of society.

It also implies that Blacks have only their individual character flaws or cultural inadequacies to blame, and not racism.

7) Racism Is Over

What they say:

“Blacks live in the past. We dealt with racism in the 1960s with all the marches, sit-ins and speeches by Martin Luther King Jr.  Laws have been changed. Segregation and lynching have ended. We have some details to work out, but real racism is pretty much a thing of the past. They need to get over it and move on.”

Response:

The absence of legalized, enforced segregation does not mean the end of racism. This denial of contemporary racism, based on an inaccurate assessment of both history and current society, romanticizes the past and diminishes today’s reality.

If there is no race problem, there would be no school-to-prison pipeline in Mississippi that leads to the arrest and sentencing of Black students for infractions as insignificant as wearing the wrong color socks.

New York City’s Stop and Frisk policy that led to 400,000 police encounters with innocent Black and Latino New Yorkers, would not have happened.

If there is no race problem,  why is a Black person 3.73 times more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession than a white person, even though Blacks and whites use marijuana at similar rates?

(Read Full Text)

And there it is. A nearly all-white crowd chanting to a nearly all-black crowd, “Shoot! Shoot! Shoot!” Contemporary racism encapsulated by an attempt to package it as support for the police, exposed by calls to shoot black men.

There are no words.

questionall:

* Panel issues recommendations after review of U.S. record

* Says killing of Michael Brown “not an isolated event”

* Decries racial bias of police, pervasive discrimination

* ACLU calls for addressing racial inequality in America

GENEVA, Aug 29 (Reuters) - The U.N. racism watchdog urged the United States on Friday to halt the excessive use of force by police after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman touched off riots in Ferguson, Missouri.

Minorities, particularly African Americans, are victims of disparities, the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) said after examining the U.S. record.

"Racial and ethnic discrimination remains a serious and persistent problem in all areas of life from de facto school segregation, access to health care and housing," Noureddine Amir, CERD committee vice chairman, told a news briefing.

Teenager Michael Brown was shot dead by a white police officer on Aug. 9, triggering violent protests that rocked Ferguson - a St. Louis suburb - and shone a global spotlight on the state of race relations in America.

"The excessive use of force by law enforcement officials against racial and ethnic minorities is an ongoing issue of concern and particularly in light of the shooting of Michael Brown," said Amir, an expert from Algeria.

"This is not an isolated event and illustrates a bigger problem in the United States, such as racial bias among law enforcement officials, the lack of proper implementation of rules and regulations governing the use of force, and the inadequacy of training of law enforcement officials."

The panel of 18 independent experts grilled a senior U.S. delegation on Aug. 13 about what they said was persistent racial discrimination against African-Americans and other minorities, including within the criminal justice system.

U.S. Ambassador Keith Harper told the panel that his nation had made “great strides toward eliminating racial discrimination” but conceded that “we have much left to do”.

Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot Brown, has been put on paid leave and is in hiding. A St. Louis County grand jury has begun hearing evidence and the U.S. Justice Department has opened its own investigation.

Police have said Brown struggled with Wilson when shot. But some witnesses say Brown held up his hands and was surrendering when he was shot multiple times in the head and chest.

"STAND YOUR GROUND" LAWS

In its conclusions issued on Friday, the U.N. panel said “Stand Your Ground” Laws, a controversial self-defense statute in 22 U.S. states, should be reviewed to “remove far-reaching immunity and ensure strict adherence to principles of necessity and proportionality when deadly force is used for self-defense”.

Ron Davis, father of Jordan Davis, a 17-year-old shot dead in a car in Jacksonville, Florida during an argument over loud rap music in November 2012, attended the Geneva session. Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen killed in Miami, Florida by a neighborhood watch volunteer, testified.

The U.N. panel monitors compliance with a treaty ratified by 177 countries including the United States.

"The Committee remains concerned at the practice of racial profiling of racial or ethnic minorities by law enforcement officials, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Transportation Security Administration, border enforcement officials and local police," it said, urging investigations.

The experts called for addressing obstacles faced by minorities and indigenous peoples to exercise their right to vote effectively. This was due to restrictive voter identification laws, district gerrymandering and state-level laws that disenfranchise people convicted of felonies, it said.

Jamil Dakwar of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said the U.N. recommendations highlighted “shortcomings on racial equality that we are seeing play out today on our streets, at our borders and in the voting booth.

"When it comes to human rights, the United States must practice at home what it preaches abroad," he said.

sinidentidades:

Today Also Marks the Anniversary of Emmett Till’s Murder
On August 28, 1955—eight years before the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom—Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi for allegedly flirting with a white store clerk, Carolyn Bryant.
Bryant’s husband, Roy, and his half brother J. W.  Milam kidnapped the 14-year-old Chicagoan from his great uncle’s home and beat him, shot him in the head, tied his body to a large metal cotton gin fan with barbed wire and dropped him into the Tallahatchie River. Three days later the teenager’s bloated, mutilated body was pulled from the river.  
Till’s mother, Mamie, insisted on an open-casket funeral for her only son so that the world might see the brutality he suffered. Two Black publications, Jet and The Chicago Defender, ran pictures of Till’s casket. 
Despite overwhelming evidence of their guilt, the two white men who killed Emmett Till were acquitted by an all-white jury. They went on to sell the story of murdering the teenager to Look magazine for $4,000.
The horrific death of Emmett Till is largely credited with intensifying the push for Black voter registration in Mississippi and serving as a catalyst for the civil rights movement in general.

sinidentidades:

Today Also Marks the Anniversary of Emmett Till’s Murder

On August 28, 1955—eight years before the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom—Emmett Till was murdered in Money, Mississippi for allegedly flirting with a white store clerk, Carolyn Bryant.

Bryant’s husband, Roy, and his half brother J. W.  Milam kidnapped the 14-year-old Chicagoan from his great uncle’s home and beat him, shot him in the head, tied his body to a large metal cotton gin fan with barbed wire and dropped him into the Tallahatchie River. Three days later the teenager’s bloated, mutilated body was pulled from the river.  

Till’s mother, Mamie, insisted on an open-casket funeral for her only son so that the world might see the brutality he suffered. Two Black publications, Jet and The Chicago Defender, ran pictures of Till’s casket. 

Despite overwhelming evidence of their guilt, the two white men who killed Emmett Till were acquitted by an all-white jury. They went on to sell the story of murdering the teenager to Look magazine for $4,000.

The horrific death of Emmett Till is largely credited with intensifying the push for Black voter registration in Mississippi and serving as a catalyst for the civil rights movement in general.

1. You know the Keystone XL? The Canadian government wants six more of those things.

While the Keystone XL pipeline has the potential to move more crude from Alberta’s infamous oil sands than any other pipeline - facilitating the rapid expansion of one of the dirtiest, most resource-intensive oil extraction operations in the world - it’s only one of seven major pipelines proposed in Canada.

Other pipelines reach south and southeast to other refineries or east or west to coastal communities for raw export. The sprawling Energy East pipeline crosses 961 waterways and half a dozen major cities in its 2,700-mile run to the Atlantic.

The Northern Gateway reaches west to ship hazardous unrefined product through pristine-but-treacherous island-spotted waters of the wild British Columbia coastline to Asia. While environmental organizations condemn almost all these projects, and most political parties refuse to support the vast majority of them, both of Canada’s poll-leading political parties unabashedly support the Keystone XL.

Both awareness of and resistance to the project is significant in Canada, but arguably underdeveloped compared to the American campaign.

wrapyourselfaroundmyfinger:

jonny-poopoo-pants:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

For The First Time Ever, All Four Eyewitness Accounts of The Murder of Michael Brown Put In Chronological OrderThe most detailed side-by-side telling of each eyewitness account of the Mike Brown murder in chronological order #JusticeForMichaelBrown [@ShaunKing]

Reblog the fuck out of this

BOOST^^^^^^^

Officer Darren Wilson fatally shot a wounded, unarmed, surrendering teenager.